Currently viewing the tag: "Guantanamo"

Remember, back in the day, when Bush and the rest of the Republican Party were calling on all of us to defer to the “commanders on the ground” when it came to military and national security policy?

Remember how Republican leaders like John McCain seemed to harbor a cringe-inducing man-crush on General David Petraeus?

Oh, how the worm has turned.

Now that a Democrat is in office, the Republican leadership in Washington is insisting that the President ignore the advice of Admiral Mike Mullen and General Petraeus (both of whom served under Premier Bush) when it comes to the issues of closing Guantanamo and torture.

Here’s what General Petraeus had to say:

General David Petraeus said this past weekend that President Obama’s decision to close down Gitmo and end harsh interrogation techniques would benefit the United States in the broader war on terror.

In an appearance on Radio Free Europe Sunday, the man hailed by conservatives as the preeminent military figure of his generation left little room for doubt about where he stands on some of Obama’s most contentious policies…

“I have long been on record as having testified and also in helping write doctrine for interrogation techniques that are completely in line with the Geneva Convention … With respect to Guantanamo, I think that the closure in a responsible manner … But doing that in a responsible manner, I think, sends an important message to the world, as does the commitment of the United States to observe the Geneva Convention when it comes to the treatment of detainees.”

And here’s Admiral Mullen:

Mullen dismissed criticism by former Vice President Dick Cheney this week against the president’s argument that Guantanamo Bay has served as an effective recruiting tool for al Qaeda.

The concern I’ve had about Guantanamo in these wars is it has been a symbol, and one which has been a recruiting symbol for those extremists and jihadists who would fight us. So and I think that centers — you know, that’s the heart of the concern for Guantanamo’s continued existence, in which I spoke to a few years ago, the need to close it,” Mullen said.

Why do the Republicans hate America?

Update: Here’s Steve Benen:

Now, I’ve been critical at times of Petraeus (and Powell, for the matter), and I’m not suggesting their arguments have merit only when I agree with their conclusions.

The point is that Petraeus’ position makes the Republican attacks that much less credible. In most GOP circles, there’s practically a religious reverence for Petraeus, and yet he now seems to have no use for the right’s single most important arguments of the day.

As a matter of policy, Obama is obviously right and his detractors are clearly wrong. But as a matter of political optics, we’re now dealing with a situation in which the president’s position — the one the right thinks is dangerous, naive, and terrorist-friendly — has been endorsed by Bush’s Defense Secretary (Gates), Bush’s chairman of the Joint Chiefs (Mullen), Bush’s Secretary of State (Powell), and the general Bush tapped to head U.S. Central Command (Petraeus).

On the other side, we have Newt Gingrich, Dick Cheney, Rush Limbaugh, and some craven members of Congress.

Publius makes a very important and provocative point about the Defcon 1 level of Republican pearl-clutching right now over the possible transfer of detainees from Guantanamo to U.S. Supermax prisons:

[T]here’s actually one thing even more disturbing than Republican dishonesty — the possibility that they are sincerely afraid of transferring the detainees. Some critics are clearly lying — no argument there. But it may well be that other Republicans are sincerely worried that the detainees’ evilness cannot be contained by any prison, or that they will brainwash their hapless prisonmates. [...]

[W]hat’s truly disturbing is that a sizeable chunk of the public still fears that the Gitmo detainees are so dangerous that they could break out and destroy towns in America with laser beams from their eyes. Some of the detainees are, of course, very bad and dangerous people. But the idea that America is so very fragile and helpless in the face of these overpowering evil forces that we can’t transfer the detainees to another prison (or give them real trials) is absurd.

So let’s hope the GOP really is lying on this one.

I’ve often wondered how much of their own lying bullshit they actually bought into. I mostly just assumed they were craven liars who knew they were pushing positions that weren’t in line with the facts. The truth may be scarier — do some of them (e.g. Michele Bachmann) actually believe some of it? The thought of that really creeps me out.

Steve Benen meditates on Publius’ thought:

[Lying] would be more comforting. Blatant dishonesty for partisan gain is much easier to understand than rampant stupidity among leading federal lawmakers.

It’s hard to say with any certainty, and there’s no doubt some variety within the group — some liars and some fools — but for what it’s worth, there’s ample evidence to support the “blatant dishonesty for partisan gain” theory. The Wall Street Journal reports today that Republicans see the debate over Gitmo as “the culmination of a carefully developed GOP strategy,” which they hope to use as “the beginning of a political comeback.”

Metavirus filed this under: , , , ,  

Publius makes a very important and provocative point about the Defcon 1 level of Republican pearl-clutching right now over the possible transfer of detainees from Guantanamo to U.S. Supermax prisons:

[T]here’s actually one thing even more disturbing than Republican dishonesty — the possibility that they are sincerely afraid of transferring the detainees. Some critics are clearly lying — no argument there. But it may well be that other Republicans are sincerely worried that the detainees’ evilness cannot be contained by any prison, or that they will brainwash their hapless prisonmates. [...]

[W]hat’s truly disturbing is that a sizeable chunk of the public still fears that the Gitmo detainees are so dangerous that they could break out and destroy towns in America with laser beams from their eyes. Some of the detainees are, of course, very bad and dangerous people. But the idea that America is so very fragile and helpless in the face of these overpowering evil forces that we can’t transfer the detainees to another prison (or give them real trials) is absurd.

So let’s hope the GOP really is lying on this one.

I’ve often wondered how much of their own lying bullshit they actually bought into. I mostly just assumed they were craven liars who knew they were pushing positions that weren’t in line with the facts. The truth may be scarier — do some of them (e.g. Michele Bachmann) actually believe some of it? The thought of that really creeps me out.

Steve Benen meditates on Publius’ thought:

[Lying] would be more comforting. Blatant dishonesty for partisan gain is much easier to understand than rampant stupidity among leading federal lawmakers.

It’s hard to say with any certainty, and there’s no doubt some variety within the group — some liars and some fools — but for what it’s worth, there’s ample evidence to support the “blatant dishonesty for partisan gain” theory. The Wall Street Journal reports today that Republicans see the debate over Gitmo as “the culmination of a carefully developed GOP strategy,” which they hope to use as “the beginning of a political comeback.”

Metavirus filed this under: , , , ,  

Publius makes a very important and provocative point about the Defcon 1 level of Republican pearl-clutching right now over the possible transfer of detainees from Guantanamo to U.S. Supermax prisons:

[T]here’s actually one thing even more disturbing than Republican dishonesty — the possibility that they are sincerely afraid of transferring the detainees. Some critics are clearly lying — no argument there. But it may well be that other Republicans are sincerely worried that the detainees’ evilness cannot be contained by any prison, or that they will brainwash their hapless prisonmates. [...]

[W]hat’s truly disturbing is that a sizeable chunk of the public still fears that the Gitmo detainees are so dangerous that they could break out and destroy towns in America with laser beams from their eyes. Some of the detainees are, of course, very bad and dangerous people. But the idea that America is so very fragile and helpless in the face of these overpowering evil forces that we can’t transfer the detainees to another prison (or give them real trials) is absurd.

So let’s hope the GOP really is lying on this one.

I’ve often wondered how much of their own lying bullshit they actually bought into. I mostly just assumed they were craven liars who knew they were pushing positions that weren’t in line with the facts. The truth may be scarier — do some of them (e.g. Michele Bachmann) actually believe some of it? The thought of that really creeps me out.

Steve Benen meditates on Publius’ thought:

[Lying] would be more comforting. Blatant dishonesty for partisan gain is much easier to understand than rampant stupidity among leading federal lawmakers.

It’s hard to say with any certainty, and there’s no doubt some variety within the group — some liars and some fools — but for what it’s worth, there’s ample evidence to support the “blatant dishonesty for partisan gain” theory. The Wall Street Journal reports today that Republicans see the debate over Gitmo as “the culmination of a carefully developed GOP strategy,” which they hope to use as “the beginning of a political comeback.”

Metavirus filed this under: , , , ,  

Publius makes a very important and provocative point about the Defcon 1 level of Republican pearl-clutching right now over the possible transfer of detainees from Guantanamo to U.S. Supermax prisons:

[T]here’s actually one thing even more disturbing than Republican dishonesty — the possibility that they are sincerely afraid of transferring the detainees. Some critics are clearly lying — no argument there. But it may well be that other Republicans are sincerely worried that the detainees’ evilness cannot be contained by any prison, or that they will brainwash their hapless prisonmates. [...]

[W]hat’s truly disturbing is that a sizeable chunk of the public still fears that the Gitmo detainees are so dangerous that they could break out and destroy towns in America with laser beams from their eyes. Some of the detainees are, of course, very bad and dangerous people. But the idea that America is so very fragile and helpless in the face of these overpowering evil forces that we can’t transfer the detainees to another prison (or give them real trials) is absurd.

So let’s hope the GOP really is lying on this one.

I’ve often wondered how much of their own lying bullshit they actually bought into. I mostly just assumed they were craven liars who knew they were pushing positions that weren’t in line with the facts. The truth may be scarier — do some of them (e.g. Michele Bachmann) actually believe some of it? The thought of that really creeps me out.

Steve Benen meditates on Publius’ thought:

[Lying] would be more comforting. Blatant dishonesty for partisan gain is much easier to understand than rampant stupidity among leading federal lawmakers.

It’s hard to say with any certainty, and there’s no doubt some variety within the group — some liars and some fools — but for what it’s worth, there’s ample evidence to support the “blatant dishonesty for partisan gain” theory. The Wall Street Journal reports today that Republicans see the debate over Gitmo as “the culmination of a carefully developed GOP strategy,” which they hope to use as “the beginning of a political comeback.”

Metavirus filed this under: , , , ,  

Publius makes a very important and provocative point about the Defcon 1 level of Republican pearl-clutching right now over the possible transfer of detainees from Guantanamo to U.S. Supermax prisons:

[T]here’s actually one thing even more disturbing than Republican dishonesty — the possibility that they are sincerely afraid of transferring the detainees. Some critics are clearly lying — no argument there. But it may well be that other Republicans are sincerely worried that the detainees’ evilness cannot be contained by any prison, or that they will brainwash their hapless prisonmates. [...]

[W]hat’s truly disturbing is that a sizeable chunk of the public still fears that the Gitmo detainees are so dangerous that they could break out and destroy towns in America with laser beams from their eyes. Some of the detainees are, of course, very bad and dangerous people. But the idea that America is so very fragile and helpless in the face of these overpowering evil forces that we can’t transfer the detainees to another prison (or give them real trials) is absurd.

So let’s hope the GOP really is lying on this one.

I’ve often wondered how much of their own lying bullshit they actually bought into. I mostly just assumed they were craven liars who knew they were pushing positions that weren’t in line with the facts. The truth may be scarier — do some of them (e.g. Michele Bachmann) actually believe some of it? The thought of that really creeps me out.

Steve Benen meditates on Publius’ thought:

[Lying] would be more comforting. Blatant dishonesty for partisan gain is much easier to understand than rampant stupidity among leading federal lawmakers.

It’s hard to say with any certainty, and there’s no doubt some variety within the group — some liars and some fools — but for what it’s worth, there’s ample evidence to support the “blatant dishonesty for partisan gain” theory. The Wall Street Journal reports today that Republicans see the debate over Gitmo as “the culmination of a carefully developed GOP strategy,” which they hope to use as “the beginning of a political comeback.”

Metavirus filed this under: , , , ,  
Publius makes a very important and provocative point about the Defcon 1 level of Republican pearl-clutching right now over the possible transfer of detainees from Guantanamo to U.S. Supermax prisons:

[T]here’s actually one thing even more disturbing than Republican dishonesty — the possibility that they are sincerely afraid of transferring the detainees. Some critics are clearly lying — no argument there. But it may well be that other Republicans are sincerely worried that the detainees’ evilness cannot be contained by any prison, or that they will brainwash their hapless prisonmates. [...]

[W]hat’s truly disturbing is that a sizeable chunk of the public still fears that the Gitmo detainees are so dangerous that they could break out and destroy towns in America with laser beams from their eyes. Some of the detainees are, of course, very bad and dangerous people. But the idea that America is so very fragile and helpless in the face of these overpowering evil forces that we can’t transfer the detainees to another prison (or give them real trials) is absurd.

So let’s hope the GOP really is lying on this one.

I’ve often wondered how much of their own lying bullshit they actually bought into. I mostly just assumed they were craven liars who knew they were pushing positions that weren’t in line with the facts. The truth may be scarier — do some of them (e.g. Michele Bachmann) actually believe some of it? The thought of that really creeps me out.

Steve Benen meditates on Publius’ thought:

[Lying] would be more comforting. Blatant dishonesty for partisan gain is much easier to understand than rampant stupidity among leading federal lawmakers.

It’s hard to say with any certainty, and there’s no doubt some variety within the group — some liars and some fools — but for what it’s worth, there’s ample evidence to support the “blatant dishonesty for partisan gain” theory. The Wall Street Journal reports today that Republicans see the debate over Gitmo as “the culmination of a carefully developed GOP strategy,” which they hope to use as “the beginning of a political comeback.”

Metavirus filed this under: , , , ,