I hardly have words to describe to what degree Minnesota Representative Michele Bachmann is a flaming, unstable lunatic:

Bachmann has “introduced a resolution that would bar the dollar from being replaced by any foreign currency.”

“She’s talking about the United States,” [Bachmann’s spokesperson, Debbee] Keller said. “This legislation would ensure that the U.S. dollar remain the currency of the United States.”

Of course, no one had been discussing any change in U.S. currency in the first place.

That’s right folks. In the face of absolutely no one suggesting that such a thing take place, a sitting U.S. member of Congress introduced a resolution to affirm that the U.S. Dollar would not be replaced by any other currency. Seriously!

Ms. Bachmann is a disgrace to her office, her state, her gender and the human race. Will someone please make this rampant Republican insanity stop!

Update: A commenter at Wonkette sums it up best:

Michele Bachmann: Proudly Protecting America From Her Own Delusional Fantasies

And this from Oliver Willis:

Both parties, especially in the hyper-partisan House, elect goobers. But Michele Bachmann is an amazingly idiotic goober.

Here’s a great wrapup of the untethered nonsense that routinely spews forth from the deranged Bachmann:

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So, the Republicans in Congress unveiled their “detailed” alternative to Obama’s budget today. How detailed, you ask? Seventeen whole pages of detail! That’s how much!

All scoffing aside on how pitifully meager the fake “budget” proposal was (many in the mainstream media were openly laughing at the document today), there was a really frightening sentence in there that is sending chills up my spine:

“Republicans propose a simple and fair tax code with a marginal tax rate for income up to $100,000 of 10 percent and 25 percent for any income thereafter.”

Steve Benen calls this out for the terrifying nonsense that it is:

No, seriously, that’s the plan… So, Bush/Cheney lowered the top rate from 39.6% to 35%, which cost hundreds of billions of dollars and helped create the largest budget deficits in American history. Now, the very same GOP lawmakers want to send the top rate from 35% to 25%, at a cost of hundreds of billions of dollars, all in the name of deficit reduction.

How much would this cost? The “detailed budget” doesn’t say.

What it would do to the deficit? The “detailed budget” doesn’t say.

What would Republicans cut to pay for this massive tax cut for the wealthiest Americans? The “detailed budget” doesn’t say.

How much would Republicans raise or spend over all? The “detailed budget” doesn’t say.

The Republican Party is quickly progressing from shamefully pitiful to downright horrifying. If this is the best they can come up with, I shudder to think what the next few years have in store for us.

Update: Here’s White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs on the Republican non-plan:

“There’s one more picture of a windmill than there are charts of numbers. And there’s exactly one picture of a windmill.”

And, the DNC’s Hari Sevugan:

“After 27 days, the best House Republicans could come up with is a 19-page pamphlet that does not include a single real budget proposal or estimate. There are more numbers in my last sentence than there are in the entire House GOP budget.”

Update 2: The Republicans’ inexorable descent into madness continues to remind me of this fantastic John Cole quote:

“I really don’t understand how bipartisanship is ever going to work when one of the parties is insane. Imagine trying to negotiate an agreement on dinner plans with your date, and you suggest Italian and she states her preference would be a meal of tire rims and anthrax. If you can figure out a way to split the difference there and find a meal you will both enjoy, you can probably figure out how bipartisanship is going to work the next few years.”

Update 3: An excellent framing of the GOP non-plan from the comments at Balloon Juice:

In short, this is what Sarah Palin would look like if she were a PDF document.

Update 4: And Ezra Klein gets mad props for evoking Twirling! (and orcs!):

The Republican proposal, as you might expect, doesn’t actually have a health care plan. But it does have this: “Republicans will be on the side of quality versus mediocrity, affordability versus unsustainable debt, and freedom of care versus bureaucrats in control. And we will be on the side of patients, doctors, and the American people.” They are also in favor of good things rather than bad things, moving forward rather than going backwards, the hobbits rather than the orcs, and always twirling, twirling, twirling towards freedom.

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“Two novels can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other involves orcs.” Kung Fu Monkey

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“Two novels can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other involves orcs.” Kung Fu Monkey

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My political leanings have ebbed and flowed over the years. In high school I was a radical left-winger. Later in college I came to be a starry-eyed Randian libertarian. Sometime toward the end of Clinton’s second term I became a somewhat right-leaning conservative with a primary focus on economic matters over those of the social variety. Over the last few years, I’ve found myself swinging back to the left.

I mention my oscillating political allegiances for a reason. The primary force behind the gradual changes in my outlook over the years has been the energy I derived from the concepts and ideas that I happened to gravitate toward at the time. In college, I was introduced to Atlas Shrugged and a number of Ayn Rand’s other writings. Something in her books touched a particular intellectual nerve (and, admittedly, a certain youthful, exceptionalist narcissism within me) that swept me up in a deeper dive over the years into other meditations on rugged individualism and the merits of free market capitalism. Although I’ve fallen out of love with a lot of my prior thinking, it was always the intellectual vigor that I found in my political/economic philosophy du jour that kept me coming back for more.

Fast forward to the present day. After bearing witness over the last eight years to quite possibly the most incurious, intellectually bankrupt President in American history, the election and inauguration of President Obama has provided me with a long-needed shot of new intellectual vigor. Even though I don’t agree with him on every issue, I am deeply grateful for the fact that we again have a President that is mentally qualified to thoroughly digest the most complex issues of the day and come up with reasoned, intellectually supportable solutions.

Contrast Obama’s demonstrated ability with what we’re being forced to witness on the other side of the political spectrum.

Socialism, Communism, Fascism, Nazism and the violent overthrow of our democratically elected government. Got it.

Instead of offering intelligent, fact-based critiques of Obama’s agenda and specific policy counterproposals, the core GOP wingnuts left in power have embarked upon an irrational, ever-escalating scorched-earth campaign to whine, lie, cry, distort facts, demonize, red-bait, race-bait, mischaracterize and fear-monger.

Even though my views on policy matters have changed over the years, I still have a good amount of empathy for various classic conservative dispositions like fiscal restraint, individual liberty, resistance to statism, etc. Although there is still a great deal of wisdom locked up in conservatism, its current incarnation is as intellectually bankrupt as anything I could imagine. If this is the best they have to offer, the Republican Party is going to have to spend a long time in the wilderness before it has any chance of reclaiming some small sliver of the intellectual underpinnings it once had.

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Harvard economics lecturer Jeffrey Miron has a compelling new article up on CNN’s website that lays out a practical, detailed case for why the war on drugs needs to end:

Prohibition of drugs corrupts politicians and law enforcement by putting police, prosecutors, judges and politicians in the position to threaten the profits of an illicit trade. This is why bribery, threats and kidnapping are common for prohibited industries but rare otherwise. Mexico‘s recent history illustrates this dramatically.

Prohibition erodes protections against unreasonable search and seizure because neither party to a drug transaction has an incentive to report the activity to the police. Thus, enforcement requires intrusive tactics such as warrantless searches or undercover buys. The victimless nature of this so-called crime also encourages police to engage in racial profiling…

Prohibitions breed disrespect for the law because despite draconian penalties and extensive enforcement, huge numbers of people still violate prohibition. This means those who break the law, and those who do not, learn that obeying laws is for suckers.

Prohibition is a drain on the public purse. Federal, state and local governments spend roughly $44 billion per year to enforce drug prohibition. These same governments forego roughly $33 billion per year in tax revenue they could collect from legalized drugs, assuming these were taxed at rates similar to those on alcohol and tobacco. Under prohibition, these revenues accrue to traffickers as increased profits.

Read the Whole Thing

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Harvard economics lecturer Jeffrey Miron has a compelling new article up on CNN’s website that lays out a practical, detailed case for why the war on drugs needs to end:

Prohibition of drugs corrupts politicians and law enforcement by putting police, prosecutors, judges and politicians in the position to threaten the profits of an illicit trade. This is why bribery, threats and kidnapping are common for prohibited industries but rare otherwise. Mexico‘s recent history illustrates this dramatically.

Prohibition erodes protections against unreasonable search and seizure because neither party to a drug transaction has an incentive to report the activity to the police. Thus, enforcement requires intrusive tactics such as warrantless searches or undercover buys. The victimless nature of this so-called crime also encourages police to engage in racial profiling…

Prohibitions breed disrespect for the law because despite draconian penalties and extensive enforcement, huge numbers of people still violate prohibition. This means those who break the law, and those who do not, learn that obeying laws is for suckers.

Prohibition is a drain on the public purse. Federal, state and local governments spend roughly $44 billion per year to enforce drug prohibition. These same governments forego roughly $33 billion per year in tax revenue they could collect from legalized drugs, assuming these were taxed at rates similar to those on alcohol and tobacco. Under prohibition, these revenues accrue to traffickers as increased profits.

Read the Whole Thing

Share
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Harvard economics lecturer Jeffrey Miron has a compelling new article up on CNN’s website that lays out a practical, detailed case for why the war on drugs needs to end:

Prohibition of drugs corrupts politicians and law enforcement by putting police, prosecutors, judges and politicians in the position to threaten the profits of an illicit trade. This is why bribery, threats and kidnapping are common for prohibited industries but rare otherwise. Mexico‘s recent history illustrates this dramatically.

Prohibition erodes protections against unreasonable search and seizure because neither party to a drug transaction has an incentive to report the activity to the police. Thus, enforcement requires intrusive tactics such as warrantless searches or undercover buys. The victimless nature of this so-called crime also encourages police to engage in racial profiling…

Prohibitions breed disrespect for the law because despite draconian penalties and extensive enforcement, huge numbers of people still violate prohibition. This means those who break the law, and those who do not, learn that obeying laws is for suckers.

Prohibition is a drain on the public purse. Federal, state and local governments spend roughly $44 billion per year to enforce drug prohibition. These same governments forego roughly $33 billion per year in tax revenue they could collect from legalized drugs, assuming these were taxed at rates similar to those on alcohol and tobacco. Under prohibition, these revenues accrue to traffickers as increased profits.

Read the Whole Thing

Share
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