Intrepid libertarian Radley Balko wrote a new must-read piece on Culture 11 on the catastrophically misguided “War on Drugs”.

This has always been a pet issue of mine, even though I know the Puritanical Insanity that ever-grips this country will probably never brook anything even remotely close to full decriminalization or legalization.

Simply put, my two main points on the topic are: (1) waging a “war” on drugs causes far more suffering than it is designed to combat; and (2) the struggle is futile and wastes billions of dollars and countless human lives.

I highly recommend reading the article. Money quote:

Even if the drug war were working—even if all the horrible things the federal government says are caused by illicit drugs were accurate (and some of them admittedly are), and even if the war on drugs were proving successful in eradicating or even significantly diminishing our access to those drugs—you’d have a difficult time arguing that the benefits would be worth the costs.

But the kicker is, of course, that it isn’t working. Much of the federal government claims about the evils associated with illicit drugs are either exaggerated or misapplied effects not of the drugs, but of the government’s prohibition of them.

More to the point, none of this is working even taking drug war advocates’ positions at face value. It is as easy to achieve an illegal high today as it was in 1981, as it was in 1971, as it was in 1915. The vast majority of you reading this either know where to get a bag of marijuana, or know someone who knows where to get one. Specific drugs come in and out of vogue, but the desire to alter one’s consciousness, to escape life’s drab monotonies, or just to call in a different mindset is as strong and pervasive as it’s ever been, going back to the stone age. It’s also just as easy to fulfill.

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Intrepid libertarian Radley Balko wrote a new must-read piece on Culture 11 on the catastrophically misguided “War on Drugs”.

This has always been a pet issue of mine, even though I know the Puritanical Insanity that ever-grips this country will probably never brook anything even remotely close to full decriminalization or legalization.

Simply put, my two main points on the topic are: (1) waging a “war” on drugs causes far more suffering than it is designed to combat; and (2) the struggle is futile and wastes billions of dollars and countless human lives.

I highly recommend reading the article. Money quote:

Even if the drug war were working—even if all the horrible things the federal government says are caused by illicit drugs were accurate (and some of them admittedly are), and even if the war on drugs were proving successful in eradicating or even significantly diminishing our access to those drugs—you’d have a difficult time arguing that the benefits would be worth the costs.

But the kicker is, of course, that it isn’t working. Much of the federal government claims about the evils associated with illicit drugs are either exaggerated or misapplied effects not of the drugs, but of the government’s prohibition of them.

More to the point, none of this is working even taking drug war advocates’ positions at face value. It is as easy to achieve an illegal high today as it was in 1981, as it was in 1971, as it was in 1915. The vast majority of you reading this either know where to get a bag of marijuana, or know someone who knows where to get one. Specific drugs come in and out of vogue, but the desire to alter one’s consciousness, to escape life’s drab monotonies, or just to call in a different mindset is as strong and pervasive as it’s ever been, going back to the stone age. It’s also just as easy to fulfill.

Share

Intrepid libertarian Radley Balko wrote a new must-read piece on Culture 11 on the catastrophically misguided “War on Drugs”.

This has always been a pet issue of mine, even though I know the Puritanical Insanity that ever-grips this country will probably never brook anything even remotely close to full decriminalization or legalization.

Simply put, my two main points on the topic are: (1) waging a “war” on drugs causes far more suffering than it is designed to combat; and (2) the struggle is futile and wastes billions of dollars and countless human lives.

I highly recommend reading the article. Money quote:

Even if the drug war were working—even if all the horrible things the federal government says are caused by illicit drugs were accurate (and some of them admittedly are), and even if the war on drugs were proving successful in eradicating or even significantly diminishing our access to those drugs—you’d have a difficult time arguing that the benefits would be worth the costs.

But the kicker is, of course, that it isn’t working. Much of the federal government claims about the evils associated with illicit drugs are either exaggerated or misapplied effects not of the drugs, but of the government’s prohibition of them.

More to the point, none of this is working even taking drug war advocates’ positions at face value. It is as easy to achieve an illegal high today as it was in 1981, as it was in 1971, as it was in 1915. The vast majority of you reading this either know where to get a bag of marijuana, or know someone who knows where to get one. Specific drugs come in and out of vogue, but the desire to alter one’s consciousness, to escape life’s drab monotonies, or just to call in a different mindset is as strong and pervasive as it’s ever been, going back to the stone age. It’s also just as easy to fulfill.

Share

Intrepid libertarian Radley Balko wrote a new must-read piece on Culture 11 on the catastrophically misguided “War on Drugs”.

This has always been a pet issue of mine, even though I know the Puritanical Insanity that ever-grips this country will probably never brook anything even remotely close to full decriminalization or legalization.

Simply put, my two main points on the topic are: (1) waging a “war” on drugs causes far more suffering than it is designed to combat; and (2) the struggle is futile and wastes billions of dollars and countless human lives.

I highly recommend reading the article. Money quote:

Even if the drug war were working—even if all the horrible things the federal government says are caused by illicit drugs were accurate (and some of them admittedly are), and even if the war on drugs were proving successful in eradicating or even significantly diminishing our access to those drugs—you’d have a difficult time arguing that the benefits would be worth the costs.

But the kicker is, of course, that it isn’t working. Much of the federal government claims about the evils associated with illicit drugs are either exaggerated or misapplied effects not of the drugs, but of the government’s prohibition of them.

More to the point, none of this is working even taking drug war advocates’ positions at face value. It is as easy to achieve an illegal high today as it was in 1981, as it was in 1971, as it was in 1915. The vast majority of you reading this either know where to get a bag of marijuana, or know someone who knows where to get one. Specific drugs come in and out of vogue, but the desire to alter one’s consciousness, to escape life’s drab monotonies, or just to call in a different mindset is as strong and pervasive as it’s ever been, going back to the stone age. It’s also just as easy to fulfill.

Share

Intrepid libertarian Radley Balko wrote a new must-read piece on Culture 11 on the catastrophically misguided “War on Drugs”.

This has always been a pet issue of mine, even though I know the Puritanical Insanity that ever-grips this country will probably never brook anything even remotely close to full decriminalization or legalization.

Simply put, my two main points on the topic are: (1) waging a “war” on drugs causes far more suffering than it is designed to combat; and (2) the struggle is futile and wastes billions of dollars and countless human lives.

I highly recommend reading the article. Money quote:

Even if the drug war were working—even if all the horrible things the federal government says are caused by illicit drugs were accurate (and some of them admittedly are), and even if the war on drugs were proving successful in eradicating or even significantly diminishing our access to those drugs—you’d have a difficult time arguing that the benefits would be worth the costs.

But the kicker is, of course, that it isn’t working. Much of the federal government claims about the evils associated with illicit drugs are either exaggerated or misapplied effects not of the drugs, but of the government’s prohibition of them.

More to the point, none of this is working even taking drug war advocates’ positions at face value. It is as easy to achieve an illegal high today as it was in 1981, as it was in 1971, as it was in 1915. The vast majority of you reading this either know where to get a bag of marijuana, or know someone who knows where to get one. Specific drugs come in and out of vogue, but the desire to alter one’s consciousness, to escape life’s drab monotonies, or just to call in a different mindset is as strong and pervasive as it’s ever been, going back to the stone age. It’s also just as easy to fulfill.

Share

Intrepid libertarian Radley Balko wrote a new must-read piece on Culture 11 on the catastrophically misguided “War on Drugs”.

This has always been a pet issue of mine, even though I know the Puritanical Insanity that ever-grips this country will probably never brook anything even remotely close to full decriminalization or legalization.

Simply put, my two main points on the topic are: (1) waging a “war” on drugs causes far more suffering than it is designed to combat; and (2) the struggle is futile and wastes billions of dollars and countless human lives.

I highly recommend reading the article. Money quote:

Even if the drug war were working—even if all the horrible things the federal government says are caused by illicit drugs were accurate (and some of them admittedly are), and even if the war on drugs were proving successful in eradicating or even significantly diminishing our access to those drugs—you’d have a difficult time arguing that the benefits would be worth the costs.

But the kicker is, of course, that it isn’t working. Much of the federal government claims about the evils associated with illicit drugs are either exaggerated or misapplied effects not of the drugs, but of the government’s prohibition of them.

More to the point, none of this is working even taking drug war advocates’ positions at face value. It is as easy to achieve an illegal high today as it was in 1981, as it was in 1971, as it was in 1915. The vast majority of you reading this either know where to get a bag of marijuana, or know someone who knows where to get one. Specific drugs come in and out of vogue, but the desire to alter one’s consciousness, to escape life’s drab monotonies, or just to call in a different mindset is as strong and pervasive as it’s ever been, going back to the stone age. It’s also just as easy to fulfill.

Share

Intrepid libertarian Radley Balko wrote a new must-read piece on Culture 11 on the catastrophically misguided “War on Drugs”.

This has always been a pet issue of mine, even though I know the Puritanical Insanity that ever-grips this country will probably never brook anything even remotely close to full decriminalization or legalization.

Simply put, my two main points on the topic are: (1) waging a “war” on drugs causes far more suffering than it is designed to combat; and (2) the struggle is futile and wastes billions of dollars and countless human lives.

I highly recommend reading the article. Money quote:

Even if the drug war were working—even if all the horrible things the federal government says are caused by illicit drugs were accurate (and some of them admittedly are), and even if the war on drugs were proving successful in eradicating or even significantly diminishing our access to those drugs—you’d have a difficult time arguing that the benefits would be worth the costs.

But the kicker is, of course, that it isn’t working. Much of the federal government claims about the evils associated with illicit drugs are either exaggerated or misapplied effects not of the drugs, but of the government’s prohibition of them.

More to the point, none of this is working even taking drug war advocates’ positions at face value. It is as easy to achieve an illegal high today as it was in 1981, as it was in 1971, as it was in 1915. The vast majority of you reading this either know where to get a bag of marijuana, or know someone who knows where to get one. Specific drugs come in and out of vogue, but the desire to alter one’s consciousness, to escape life’s drab monotonies, or just to call in a different mindset is as strong and pervasive as it’s ever been, going back to the stone age. It’s also just as easy to fulfill.

Share

Intrepid libertarian Radley Balko wrote a new must-read piece on Culture 11 on the catastrophically misguided “War on Drugs”.

This has always been a pet issue of mine, even though I know the Puritanical Insanity that ever-grips this country will probably never brook anything even remotely close to full decriminalization or legalization.

Simply put, my two main points on the topic are: (1) waging a “war” on drugs causes far more suffering than it is designed to combat; and (2) the struggle is futile and wastes billions of dollars and countless human lives.

I highly recommend reading the article. Money quote:

Even if the drug war were working—even if all the horrible things the federal government says are caused by illicit drugs were accurate (and some of them admittedly are), and even if the war on drugs were proving successful in eradicating or even significantly diminishing our access to those drugs—you’d have a difficult time arguing that the benefits would be worth the costs.

But the kicker is, of course, that it isn’t working. Much of the federal government claims about the evils associated with illicit drugs are either exaggerated or misapplied effects not of the drugs, but of the government’s prohibition of them.

More to the point, none of this is working even taking drug war advocates’ positions at face value. It is as easy to achieve an illegal high today as it was in 1981, as it was in 1971, as it was in 1915. The vast majority of you reading this either know where to get a bag of marijuana, or know someone who knows where to get one. Specific drugs come in and out of vogue, but the desire to alter one’s consciousness, to escape life’s drab monotonies, or just to call in a different mindset is as strong and pervasive as it’s ever been, going back to the stone age. It’s also just as easy to fulfill.

Share