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It basically destroyed Libya, so that a large number of people in the 212 area code could feel good about themselves four years ago. If Clinton, Rice, Power, Obama, et al., not to mention the war hungry press actually cared about the Libyan people, then maybe we’d be talking about this stuff. They don’t, however, so we’re not.
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Not sure exactly how else to describe this. It’s the sort of thing that ends a person’s stardom.
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Just a reminder that Senate Democrats’ policy of just allowing whoever has been on a committee the longest time to run it regularly leads to embarrassment. Long past time to change it.
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Maybe there’s some compelling evidence that self-imposed term limits are great electoral politics. But it seems loony to go to all the trouble of running for office while precluding the possibility of most effectively making change.
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A new feature? Indeed yes, we’ll give it a shot.

Star Trek Voyager: Mortal Coil (Season 4, Stream here). I figured I’d start with an obscure choice. After all, Voyager was never even remotely hip, and very rarely tried anything too dangerous (or interesting) with the Star Trek formula. But this episode is a definite exception from the show’s most solid era, spanning the fourth and fifth seasons. Mortal Coil is a Neelix episode, which should be a further strike against it. But this is one of the rare times they used the character well–they kept trying to make him like Quark from Deep Space Nine, but the character always had too much of an edge to play that kind of role on the show, and this show makes great use of that edge for sure. In brief, this episode is just about the best exploration of faith and spirituality that Star Trek ever did, and might well be the best and most sympathetic treatment of atheism in the medium’s history (this might have something to do with the small sample size as well, though). In brief, Neelix dies early in the episode, is revived, but rather than feeling fortunate or lucky, he’s deeply angry about it, especially about having been “unnaturally” revived by Borg technology. In time we learn that the real reason he’s angry is because the one thing that kept him going after his entire family died in war, and throughout his entire life in fact, was this spiritual belief in an afterlife where he’d see them all again. Now he’s died and seen that there’s no such thing, and the episode is unsparing as he veers from anger to deep depression, trying to figure out how to deal with the loss of something so central to how he saw the world. Shockingly, Chakotay’s mystical religious thoughts do more harm than good, and he spirals downward. The ending nicely wraps up this story–ultimately, after all of this, you just have to go on living. Surprisingly sensitive and thoughtful for Voyager, or really for anything.

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I was just thinking the other day of that Martha Coakley/Scott Brown election. Why? I don’t know. But I had forgotten just how much a part of her pitch was that she was running for Ted Kennedy’s seat, something I have to imagine hurt her because there’s now way she wins that comparison. Funny, then, how the woman who actually won her seat didn’t have to yammer about the Tedster all the time. She just up and became his successor. And, really, one of the better reasons to hope for a less sucky Democratic Party.
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I’m not really sure how they could have brought Twin Peaks back without him, honestly. Well, I guess they did try, sorta, with Fire Walk With Me. It suffered for that.

The spousal unit and I have been watching the show on the new Blu-Ray transfer. We’re now in the middle of the second season, just finished up the notorious “James On The Road” stretch. Those execrable scenes aside, it’s an interesting watch. What’s most clear is that there was no hand guiding the tiller at that point of the show, otherwise they might have, say, cut back on one or two of the half-dozen comic relief subplots running at once. But it is pretty amazing that the show managed to cycle from near-perfect to completely lost to near-perfect again two whole times during such a short run. I can’t wait to see what they do next.

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